Pricing Photography Revisited

30 Aug

…or The Rental Car Analogy…

Last week, I updated about the Value of Photography. This week, I’d like to give you an analogy that has worked for me … the rental car comparison, also an updated blog.

© 2008 Arnold Zann.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail Arnie (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.

Don’t laugh! They are not dissimilar. A client or editor or whatever says to you, “Hey, I paid for it, I own it.”

“Ah, no. What you actually paid for is usage of that photograph,” and I go on to give this easy-to-understand explanation.

TBC: “You’ve rented a car in the past, right?”

CLIENT: “Ah, yuhhh.”

TBC: “You rent a car for two days, and it costs you twice as much as one day, yes?”

CLIENT: “Yes.”

TBC: “That’s like paying for Continue reading 

The Value of Photography Revisited

23 Aug

This blog was first published in 2009, but recently updated, it has just as much relevance today…

© 1984 Arnold Zann. All Rights Reserved.  For usage and fees, contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278.  919-643-3036 before 9 pm east coast USA, GMT-5, or by e-mail at Arnie (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com.
In our workshops, we always encourage talented people to insist on a fair price for “selling” their photos. Just because one is an “amateur” does not mean that a credit line is ample reward for a published photograph.

There are many amateurs we know whose work is better than that of some professional photographers. Everyone should know that the copyright to any of his/her photographs is established at the click of the shutter which includes, among other things, the right to negotiate decent pricing for usage.

We were reminded several years ago of the thrill of the prospect of seeing your first photograph in print, hopefully with your credit line alongside. A friend of ours, and one of our alumni, produced a striking photograph that a large university wanted to pick up for use in next year’s media guide, possibly on the cover, too. How exciting to have your work recognized in such a fashion!

Along with congratulations, I wrote back saying that any photograph worth publishing is worth commanding a fair price, whether produced by an amateur or a pro. An arresting photograph is an arresting photograph regardless of the source. Remember the expression, “A picture is worth a thousand words?”

Alas, Corporate America and publications are devaluing photography. They want to get
Continue reading 

Selecting a Photo Workshop Updated

16 Aug

Updated (yet again) August 13, 2014

From comments we hear from people who join us, it appears that this post I wrote several years ago warrants republishing.

© 2012 Arnold Zann.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail Arnie (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at  919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.
A lot of photo enthusiasts enjoy going to workshops. Why? For one thing, one can photograph without the distractions of family, business, and other commitments.

For another, there is a great synergy when a lot of photographers get together and share their work. Synergy, by the way, according to The American Heritage Dictionary, is “The interaction of two or more agents or forces so that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects.” Merriam-Webster notes that it comes from from the New Latin synergia, cooperation, from sunergos (συνεργός) — sun = together, ergos = working — or working together.

And work together is what you do in a photo workshop. You shoot together; you critique together; you often edit together; you share information; you get up early together and burn the midnight oil together; you often eat together; you … I could go on!

In a workshop setting, you gain inspiration from fellow participants, something you can never truly fathom until you have been in this setting. You can, after all, put 100 photographers (perish the thought) lined up to photograph a particular view; and more than likely, you will get 100 different renditions of that view. The point is that we all see differently, and we all choose to interpret a subject in different ways.

© 2011 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at  919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.You will learn to see differently, and you will improve your sense of composition and sense of what does and does not make an effective photograph. You may also learn about digital workflow and some of the programs that can help you. You may spend a lot of time in the classroom, or most of your hours may be spent outdoors.

I just Googled “photo workshops” and came up with approximately 54,700,000 results. That’s considerably up from “about 234,000” results when I first wrote this blog in April of 2008. For me, that would be reason enough to just stop looking. How can I possibly wade through Continue reading