The Care and Feeding of Your Lightroom Catalog

25 Apr
 

… or, The Health and Maintenance of Your Lightroom Catalog

© 2011 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.
I first wrote this in December of 2011, and it has been revised several times since. As we work with participants in our workshops, I am reminded that it is again time to update and republish this blog.

For those who want to get a leg-up in Lightroom, we are asking if people are interested in a Lightroom 6 workshop in mid-July 2015 in Hillsborough, NC. This would be two half-days so that the participants have a chance to absorb the basics before moving on. There are cheap flights into Raleigh/Durham, RDU, and if there are enough people who sign up, we can try to arrange for a discount at a local hotel. Let us know!

So, why the cactus images? Lightroom can get what I call nudgy. It gets prickly and uncooperative. You do a normal task and get the most fascinating results, usually not at all what you had in mind.

In my blog called Lightroom Setup, which I should probably update, too, I made some suggestions for setting up your preferences in Lightoom.

I have already made some revisions to this blog based on input from both our readers and Lightroom expert Rob Sylvan of the help desk at NAPP as well as his own Lightroomers.

This time, we’ll address what I call the care and feeding of your Lightroom catalog to keep it healthy.

Computers fail. Programs fail. So, it is not a question of if something will fail, rather when it will.

Most of us have been through it to one degree or another. The information gets lost in the worst sand storm in recent decades, and it’s a long, dusty road getting everything back to the way we want it.© 2011 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.

Backing up your information is critical to the health and survival of anyone owning a computer. For those who want to read more on this, go to my very-recently-updated blog Backup, Backup, Backup.

A couple of reminders. Some people have computers with minimal capabilities for the latest versions of Lightroom (6 was just released). While we recommend choosing in your Catalog Settings to “Backup once a day when exiting Lightroom,” you may Skip this operation sometimes when exiting Lightroom when you do not have time, but don’t forget to backup the next time!. Those people with borderline computer capabilities may wish to Optimize in a separate action from Backing up. While we have not experienced this, some people have reported Lightroom crashing when trying to Optimize in the same operation as Backing up.

There are several other things you can adopt to keep your Lightroom catalog working well.

First, for those who don’t know, Continue reading 

Backup, Backup, Backup

11 Apr
 

Originally published February 2011, Updated April 10, 2015

OK, so I’m anal. I don’t just back up our images once, I do it in triplicate for irreplaceable files and in duplicate for other files. Yup, you heard me, at least twice, and more often, thrice. That’s four copies total of all Arnie’s and my photographs. As the old ad says, “…Because I’m worth it!”

© 2015 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 1-919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5. So, why all those copies? Easy, if one or two of my external hard drives fail, we are still good to go. We’re professionals, and over the years, we’ve made too many images that we don’t want to lose.

For example, the one at the right, “Misty Islands,” has sold numerous times as a fine-art piece and hangs in Continue reading 

A Look at the Past for Inspiration

4 Apr
 

Arnie and I are continually amazed at the famous names in photography that are unknown by most photographers. Back a century or so, people apprenticed under a master artist or went to museums to study technique and gain inspiration. Today, people get a digital camera and go out, clicking indiscriminately away. Of course, this does not apply to those who really want to improve their photography, but one cannot move forward if one does not know about the past.

In our workshops, we point to Rembrandt for the quality and magic of light and mystery of shadow. Was he a photographer? No, but he was an artist, and any serious photographer seeks to be an artist, too.

Most people have heard about Daguerre or at least Louis-Jacques-Mandé’s invention of the daguerreotype process. But how many heave heard of William Henry Fox Talbot and his camera obscura who lived in the charming little hamlet of Lacock in the Cotswolds? © 1864 John Moffat

Many of the photo magazines today pander to the lowest common denominator. So many of the photographs in today’s journals are flat, have no depth. There is no magic of light and mystery of shadow. HDR run amok. Sounds a bit snotty? Maybe, but what is wrong with developing a discerning eye? Anyone can do it.

Some people know the work of Margaret Bourke-White, the first woman photojournalist hired by Continue reading