My Shack, Different Light

16 Jan
 

My Shack, Different Light

My Shack, Different Light is the subject of this week’s blog. Readers and alumni have asked how I have treated a subject time and time again and made it different each time. Others have said, “I photographed that two hours ago.” Yeah, but the light is different now.

In fact, the light is ever-changing; it is ephemeral and continually surprises us with her new renditions. There is a location I have photographed for years on the Outer Banks, and we return to it time and time again. Why? Because, as noted above, the light is always different.

In this case, we were treated to a red sky the likes of which I have never seen repeated there in quite the same way. This was also one of my early panos.© 2008 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 1-919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET.  My Shack, Different Light

That same fall, within a two-week period, I made two more photographs from this location.© 2008 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 1-919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET.  My Shack, Different Light© 2008 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 1-919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET.  My Shack, Different Light

Three completely different looks, different weather patterns, different light. My Shack, always different.

Skipping ahead two years, three more images shot on two successive days. This was the one from that first day … © 2010 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 1-919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET.  My Shack, Different Light

The following day, we returned, and the next two images were made eleven Continue reading 

Making Mistakes

9 Jan
 

Making Mistakes

Making Mistakes is one of the first blogs I wrote, and it bears periodic updating.

In 1859, the Scottish author, Samuel Smiles wrote in Self Help, “We often discover what will do, by finding out what will not do; and probably he who never made a mistake never made a discovery.”
Manual for Brownie Hawkeye Camera making mistakes
Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. We often learn more from our mistakes than from our successes. Think back to your childhood and teen years. How often did you ignore your parents’ admonishments and do something anyway.

Learning the consequences of that mistake had so much more impact than your parents’ warning, and you learned by first-hand experience that perhaps you didn’t want to repeat that mistake in the future. And, you survived!

By the same token, I had a great aunt, a famous heart doctor, who always said that it was more important to publish your failures than your successes. It kept others from wasting a lot of energy, time, and money going down that same particular path. Instead, other researchers could try a different approach, or perhaps a variation on the scenario that didn’t work, and in doing so, might make some “mistakes” that resulted in some great discoveries.

I suspect many of the great inventions of our world came from making mistakes that turned out to be amazing successes.

Think of the artichoke.  Glamorous, it ain’t. If you saw one for the first time, would you be tempted to eat one?  And what about the choke and those prickles on the tips of the leaves?  Some one must have been desperate to be the first to try one, maybe pricked his fingers and dropped it into the fire, making yet another mistake. Personally, I am eternally grateful for those first people who dared try something different by sampling, whether through desperation or chance, that wonderful, strange creature!

And so it is with photography. If we are afraid of making mistakes, of taking chances, we can’t grow as photographers. Cameras these days save us from ourselves if we allow them to. I never set my camera to A (automatic) and very, VERY rarely to P (program). I mean, really, look at this box. Do you see anything that would speak to program or automatic modes? I was amused, by the way, to discover that camera is considered an antique. Oh well!

Brownie Hawkeye Camera Flash Model Box making mistakesI was eight, when I got one of them, my first camera, a Brownie Hawkeye Flash Model that took 620 film, the precursor to 120 film that came on a slightly thicker spool. 120 wasn’t introduced until 1965. The adjustments on my Brownie were minimal, but when I Continue reading 

Create a Copyright Template

2 Jan
 

Create a Copyright Template and Preset in Lightroom & Bridge.

…But if you use another program, you can adapt this information to create a copyright template or preset there.

Before I begin, please note that bit by bit, I update the images for this blog. If the dates in the screen shots aren’t current, mentally substitute the current year … 201x … for them. The principles, after all, remain the same.

And check out the updated list for photo workshops. More details may be found on our website.

© 2010 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET. create a copyright templateI start my blog, originally written several years back, © Is for Copyright, with, “I know I shouldn’t be, but I am always surprised at how little people know about copyright. To me and many others — pros and amateurs — the little “c” in the Copyright symbol is part of the basic ABCs of photography. You can find all sorts of appropriate principles for A and B, but C is definitely for Copyright.”

We do not import any of our images without attaching our copyright notice to it, and we strongly recommend the same practice to our workshop participants. There is too much theft out there. “What’s mine is mine, and by the way, what’s yours is mine, too,” seems to be the way the world has been going for quite a few years now.

So, if you have not yet done so, you need to create a copyright template or preset in Photoshop/Bridge or Lightroom, use this as your guide.

Your copyright notice is very important. It lets would-be infringers know that you take your copyright seriously. See © is for Copyright, if you haven’t already read it.

This is very important, as there are only three legal forms of a copyright notice, and even seasoned photographers often list their copyright incorrectly. Arghhh! Also, for those who don’t know how to make the © symbol, directions are here for that, too. Or because of the vagaries of various laptop keyboards, just copy this © and paste it into your own copyright notice(s). Remember (c) is not acceptable as the copyright symbol. You really need that “c” enclosed in a circle … ©!

Making a preset or template for your copyright notice is actually easier than you might think. For those who come to our workshops, please set yours up before you arrive, and I will double check it to make sure you haven’t missed anything. Macs and PCs use different terms and procedures for executing certain tasks sometimes, but the principles are the same. These directions are for PCs, but those of you with Macs will know what to press or select instead. For the screen shots below, look for the red arrows and/or boxes to show you where to look for this or that feature. For Mac users, if it isn’t there, just click on the red “close” button in the upper left of your window.

LIGHTROOM DIRECTIONS

If you do not have any images “in” Lightroom, “import” just one from this year. I use quotes, as your photographs are not actually imported into Lightroom or any other imaging program, only thumbnails for the images and the ability to work on the photographs. Your photographs are exactly where you put them, either in a folder in your computer or on your external hard drive. For those to whom this sounds like some obscure language, there are some great tutorials on different functions and aspects of Lightroom by Adobe developer and guru Julieanne Kost listed on our Resources page.

Now that you have at least one image from the current year visible in Lightroom, make sure you are in Library module, grid view — g is the keyboard shortcut —(multiple images showing on “light table” in center), and click on the image to select it. If you have a folder with more than one image, click on any image in the folder. (Figure 1)
© 2015 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET. create a copyright template
Figure 1

In the right panel (check our Lightroom Introduction on our blog if the panel doesn’t show), scroll down to the Metadata section and make sure it is open (click the triangle to the right of “Metadata” if it is closed). (Figure 2)

© 2015 Margo Taussig Pinkerton. All Rights Reserved. For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC 27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. Eastern Time, ET. create a copyright templateFigure 2

Click on the up-down arrows to the right of the field on the left and select EXIF and IPTC. Now click on the up-down arrows to the right of the field labeled Preset and select Edit Presets … at the bottom. (Figure 2)

If you are making a preset for the first time, None will be listed in the Preset field rather than my TBC © 2014 (now 2016 since January 1).  Arnie has his own copyright notice, so we differentiate between the two, but that is not likely to be your scenario.

The fields are already filled in below (Figure 3), because none of our images is without a copyright notice.

Hopefully, you will follow this same example. Be sure to click on the Continue reading