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Create a Copyright Template in Lightroom and Bridge

13 Dec

A How-to on Creating a Copyright Template/Preset

Before I begin, check out the updated list for photo workshops. More details may be found on our website.

© 2010 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.I start my blog, originally written several years back, © Is for Copyright, with, “I know I shouldn’t be, but I am always surprised at how little people know about copyright. To me and many others — pros and amateurs — the little “c” in the Copyright symbol is part of the basic ABCs of photography. You can find all sorts of appropriate principles for A and B, but C is definitely for Copyright.”

We do not import any of our images without attaching our copyright notice to it, and we strongly recommend the same practice to our workshop participants. There is too much theft out there. “What’s mine is mine, and by the way, what’s yours is mine, too,” seems to be the way the world has been going for quite a few years now.

So, if you have not yet done so, you need to create a copyright preset (lightroom) or template (Photoshop/Bridge). These examples are for Lightroom, but we’ll also give instructions for Photoshop, done through Bridge. And for those who use other imaging programs, look up “presets” or “templates”s under Help in the menu, and use this as your guide.

Your copyright notice is very important. It lets would-be infringers know that you take your copyright seriously. See © is for Copyright, if you haven’t already read it.

This is very important, as there are only three legal forms of a copyright notice, and even seasoned photographers often list their copyright incorrectly. Arghhh! Also, for those who don’t know how to make the © symbol, directions are here for that, too. Or because of the vagaries of various laptop keyboards, just copy this © and paste it into your own copyright notice(s). Remember (c) is not acceptable as the copyright symbol. You really need that “c” enclosed in a circle … ©!

Making a preset or template for your copyright notice is actually easier than you might think. For those who come to our workshops, please set yours up before you arrive, and I will double check it to make sure you haven’t missed anything. Macs and PCs use different terms and procedures for executing certain tasks sometimes, but the principles are the same. These directions are for PCs, but those of you with Macs will know what to press or select instead.

LIGHTROOM DIRECTIONS

If you do not have any images “in” Lightroom, “import” just one from this year. I use quotes, as your photographs are not actually imported into Lightroom or any other imaging program, only thumbnails for the images and the ability to work on the photographs. Your photographs are exactly where you put them, either in a folder in your computer or on your external hard drive. For those to whom this sounds like some obscure language, there are some great tutorials on different functions and aspects of Lightroom by Adobe developer and guru Julieanne Kost listed on our Resources page.

Now that you have at least one image from the current year visible in Lightroom, make sure you are in Library module, grid view (multiple images showing on “light table” in center), and click on the image to select it. If you have a folder with more than one image, click on any image in the folder. (Figure 1)

© 2013 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.Figure 1

In the right panel (check out some Lightroom basics on our blog if the panel doesn’t show), scroll down to the Metadata section and make sure it is open (click the triangle to the right of “Metadata” if it is closed). (Figure 2)

© 2013 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  For usage and fees, please e-mail TBC (at) BCphotoadventures (dot) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time, GMT-5.Figure 2

Click on the up-down arrows to the right of the field on the left and select EXIF and IPTC. Now click on the up-down arrows to the right of the field labeled Preset and select Edit Presets … at the bottom. (Figure 2)

If you are making a preset for the first time, None will be listed in the Preset field rather than my TBC © 2013.  Arnie has his own copyright notice, so we differentiate between the two, but that is not likely your scenario.

The fields are already filled in below (Figure 3), because none of our images is without a copyright notice.

Hopefully, you will follow this same example. Be sure to click on the Continue reading 

Backup, Backup, Backup

5 Feb

Updated March 7, 2011

OK, so I’m anal. I don’t just back up our images once, I do it in triplicate for irreplaceable files and in duplicate for other files. Yup, you heard me, at least twice, and more often, thrice. That’s four copies total of all Arnie’s and my photographs. As the old ad says, “…Because I’m worth it!”

© 1988 Margo Taussig Pinkerton.  All Rights Reserved.  From Barefoot Contessa Photo Adventures.  For usage and fees, please e-mail BC (at) ZAPphoto (at) com or contact us at 310 Lafayette Drive, Hillsborough, NC  27278 or at 919-643-3036 before 9 p.m. east-coast time. So, why all those copies? Easy, if one or two of my external hard drives fail, we are still good to go. We’re professionals, and over the years, we’ve made too many images that we don’t want to lose.

For example, the one at the right, “Misty Islands,” has sold numerous times as a fine-art piece and hangs in Continue reading 

Digital Asset Management – Part IV

21 Nov

… or How to Cope in the Digital Age of Photography

Updated October 14, 2011

Organizing & Finding your Images

As many of you know, we have been talking about Digital Asset Management. The final, and perhaps most important part, is organizing your images so you can find them later. We have already discussed naming conventions, but what if you want to find that shot of Great Aunt Minnie taken several years ago, but you aren’t sure exactly when … Continue reading